Tuesday, February 14, 2006

bleap bloop blarp bloip

bleap bloop blarp bloip

Oh, hey - that's a cue-tone!

Which means: we interrupt our usual blogg-writing for

*** A BLOGG COMMERCIAL ***

Hey bloggist! Has all your blogg-reading - and writing - left you feeling tired and irritable? Why not...

(Ahem! Wrong script. Let's try this again.)

Attention, nephews and nieces of Aunt Frances and Uncle Gilbert! In case you think all that "Pope stuff" you've been reading here is all "nice and theoretical", and "good journal-article type stuff", here's something practical for you to join with your host, Dr. Thursday, in doing.

Starting today, until February 22, the feast of the Chair of St. Peter (a total of nine days!) say a rosary for the intentions of our Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI.

That's it. No coupon to clip. No form to fill out. You don't even have to double-click. Today lots of people are giving (and receiving) roses - here's your chance to send 53 - nine times - all the way to Rome, without all those thorns, leaf-pruning, and water-spilling! And no credit card bill either! You can't beat that price anywhere else!
But now I gotta read the fine print: Please note - you need not post a comment in order to join. That's between you and God. I would have preferred not to have to post this at all - but even an occasional commercial break has its uses in the Divine Economy. (Oh, you don't think so? Just wait... you'll see.)
Don't forget - it's just nine days - synchronize your calendars... get practical...

We now return you to our regularly scheduled posting...

6 Comments:

At 14 February, 2006 21:37, Anonymous rose said...

great idea! thanks for posting it.

 
At 14 February, 2006 23:02, Blogger laurathecrazymama said...

NO PROBLEMO, but I'm going to start at midnight because that's when I go to adoration, does that count if I say another one during the day tomorrow...how about if I start it one minute before midnight?

 
At 15 February, 2006 11:36, Blogger Elinor Dashwood said...

I'm sorry to be a pill, but what times nine is fifty-three? Good idea about the novena, however.

Sometime you ought to try the Express Novena, for occasions when a very important intention comes up suddenly, and you don't have nine days' warning. You pray every hour for nine hours. What it lacks in necessary endurance it makes up in commitment to keep an eye on the clock and remember to pray for your intention every hour. I thought this up on my own, but I'm always running into people who thought of it for themselves, too.

 
At 15 February, 2006 12:02, Blogger Dr. Thursday said...

Sorry if I was confusing - I will write out the math.

By saying the standard rosary of three singles plus five decades of Hail Marys (that totals 53) each day of the novena, you'll be sending nine "bouquets" each containing fifty-three "roses".

That means 9 times 53, which equals 477 roses, sent Celestial Express direct to Benedict in Roma...

Also: Yes, you can join at any time - you may already be familiar with that delivery organization - they can handle deliveries 24/7.

And it's YOUR gift, which you can personalize as you see fit...

Yes, I've known the "lightning novena" of nine hours. Another interesting development is the "lightning rosary" wherein one says a total of twenty Hail Marys, naming and calling to mind each of the twenty mysteries... nice shorthand arrangement and an excellent overview of our Lord's work.

 
At 15 February, 2006 14:18, Blogger Nancy C. Brown said...

I've already done a nine minute and a nine second novena. There's probably someone out there who's done a nine nanosecond novena. Hey I like the sound of that.

As you know, I'm in. And also with that other intention :-)

 
At 16 February, 2006 11:28, Blogger Elinor Dashwood said...

What, the Our Fathers aren't part of the Rosary? They would bring the prayer total to fifty-nine per Rosary if you didn't count the Creed, and sixty if you did. Sixty is a much nicer number (although fifty-nine is a prime number), and has the advantage of being a round five dozen, which sorts well with the bouquet metaphor.

 

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